Barn Raising in Japan

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Heritage Restorations had the unique opportunity to raise one of our restored historic timber frames in Japan!

We dismantled and restored an 1840’s timber frame barn from the tranquil fields of upstate New York and reerected it in the bustling metropolis of Tokyo, Japan.

For the first leg of its journey, the barn was transported 2000 miles by truck to our shop in Waco, Texas. The entire frame was completely cleaned, restored, and fumigated. It was then loaded into two overseas shipping containers for the trip to Japan.

From Waco, the containers were sent by truck and loaded on a freight train for the 1500 mile trip to Los Angeles. In the port of Los Angeles, the barn was loaded onto a huge overseas barge for the 5500 mile, three week trip to Japan.

Texas meets the Far East, 7.16.10

Once unloaded in Japan, the barn was loaded for the last time on a truck and delivered to its new home in Tokyo.

Four men from Heritage Restorations made the 17 hour flight to Tokyo to direct the barn raising. Working alongside our new found Japanese friends, the barn was reerected in a single day.

As craftsmen have done for centuries after completing a well crafted piece of work, everyone signed their names on the barns large swing beam.

The second rim is glued in the same method as the first and the paddles slide between the two rims each locking into place with a 1.5″ extension beyond the exterior rim wall.  The extension helps reduce the rim drag in the water making the wheel as efficient as possible with a given water flow.

If you could travel back in time and attempt to explain to the early American farmer who built this barn that in 150 years the barn would be transported from the little hamlet of Glen, New York to Waco, Texas, to Los Angeles, California and half way around the world to be raised in Japan, he’d have thought you were off your rocker! You could then tell him that the men who did the work flew through the air across the ocean to do it!

The completed barn is now used as a community center, and will be used as a model to show to other prospective Japanese customers who may also want …a piece of American History in the Far East.

Comments

  • Raymond Attard
    Reply

    I can only imagine the delight felt by the Japanese people who embarked on this incredible project.
    You can then tell the builders of my barn, some 250 years ago that there barn would travel to a newly discovered piece of land called Australia, inhabited by native Aborigionals. They would have you and I admitted to a special hospital I’m sure. :)

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